Effects of an Anti-bullying Program on the Performance of the First Grade Students

Effects of an Anti-bullying Program on the Performance of the First Grade Students
Introduction
For years now, schools have developed different antibullying programs aimed at dealing with any form of violence and bullying in the schools. One of the most traditional antibullying strategies is the Olweus model. The elementary schools adopted the Olweus bullying prevention program which sought to identify the bullies at the elementary school level and assist the victims to deal with the impacts of this violence (Lacey & Cornell, 2013). It also focused on a classroom-based program which has been successful in growing the social competence and lowering the anti-social behaviors and decreasing aggressive actions among the first-grade students. Olweus model also recommends the need to respond in a positive way to the violence actions of the students. It involves the training of the first-grade students about the varied social skills and the methods which could be used to respond to the conflicts.
Evans, Fraser, and Cotter (2014) suggests that the bullies tend to interpret the situational cues in a different approach from the non-aggressive persons. They also lack the social intelligence to interact with their peers peacefully in the schools. In the elementary schools, the antibullying programs integrate the various approaches to conflict resolution within the school systems to understand the behavior of individuals (Yeager, Fong, Lee & Espelage, 2015). The research hypothesis about the effects of antibullying programs on the performance of the first-grade students was statistically significant. It provided a clear justification on the need to curb potential bullies in the elementary schools. The anti-bullying programs seek to support equality towards problem-solving through reducing social dominance (Hong & Espelage, 2012). The nonviolent children could see to follow the programs, but could end up frustrated. The absence of significant incentive for the bullies leads to the skepticism of the success of the programs. However, most research studies including by the study of Evans et al (2014) suggest that anti-bullying programs could lead to positive outcomes which are statistically important.
Numerous school anti-bullying strategies have been implemented, but it remains known whether the programs are appropriate for obtaining the intended objectives. The research could seek to subject the anti-bullying programs to empirical review to understand their actual success among the first-grade students. Lacey and Cornell (2013) found out that the anti-bullying programs were able to bring about positive impacts on the performance of the first-grade students. It was able to trigger social transformation as well as improving the social intelligence of the bullies which helps the first-grade students to adapt to the aggressive behaviors in the schools (Evans et al., 2014). Antibullying prevention policies make it possible for the teachers to identify and suppress any bullies before they cause any harm to their colleagues. Therefore, it is clear that the anti-bullying program can improve the performance of the first-grade students in the elementary schools.
Research Problem
Teachers have been using various anti-bullying programs to improve the performance of the first students. The main research concern is to determine whether the implementation of the antibullying program improves the performance of the first-grade students. It is difficult to prove that the anti-bullying programs improves or undermines the performance of the first-grade students due to the lack of strong metrics of measuring progress (Kärnä et al., 2013). The schools spend a lot of costs to implement the antibullying programs and thus, it is critical to understand the positive contributions of the programs to the performance of the students. For instance, it will seek to develop a safe and supporting learning climate for the first-grade students. The role of the anti-bullying programs is to improve the social relations and environment with the school. Therefore, the research study will try to understand the effects of the antibullying program in improving the performance of the first-grade students.
Research Questions
To address the research problem on the impacts of an antibullying program on the performance of the first-grade students, the researcher will need to answer the following research questions
1. What is the success of the anti-bullying programs on improving the performance of the first-grade students?
2. What are the perceptions of the elementary teachers about the performance of antibullying programs?
Definition of Terms
Bullying. It defines the element of an imbalance of power between the victims and the bully whereby the bully acts in an aggressive behavior and in an intention to harm the other person (Yeager et al., 2015). Nevertheless, the children have a diverse understanding of the nature and process of bullying in the schools.
Anti-bullying program. It defines strategies and approaches undertaken by the schools to limit the actions and behaviors of the bullies in the schools. For example, they could include strategies to deal with the psychological element of bullying process on the first-grade students. The anti-bullying program also helps to create a good environment for the students to learn effectively.
Performance. It defines the nature of academic success and ability to get good grades in the schools. The academic success involves impacts of the student behavior to academically get good grades as well as obtain positive outcomes in the schools. Thus, it is appropriate to deal with an issue which could limit the academic success among the students.
First-grade students. It describes the first-grade learners in the elementary school who are in their first-year education. They are children aged mainly from 6 to 7 years old within the grade level (Kärnä et al., 2013). They are usually vulnerable and sensitive to any form of bullying in the schools. Thus, the first-grade students do not have much social intelligence and knowledge.

References
Evans, C. B., Fraser, M. W., & Cotter, K. L. (2014). The effectiveness of school-based bullying prevention programs: A systematic review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 19(5), 532-544.
Hong, J. S., & Espelage, D. L. (2012). A review of research on bullying and peer victimization in school: An ecological system analysis. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 17(4), 311-322.
Kärnä, A., Voeten, M., Little, T. D., Alanen, E., Poskiparta, E., & Salmivalli, C. (2013). Effectiveness of the KiVa Antibullying Program: Grades 1–3 and 7–9. Journal of Educational Psychology, 105(2), 535.
Lacey, A., & Cornell, D. (2013). The impact of teasing and bullying on schoolwide academic performance. Journal of Applied School Psychology,29(3), 262-283.
Yeager, D. S., Fong, C. J., Lee, H. Y., & Espelage, D. L. (2015). Declines in efficacy of anti-bullying programs among older adolescents: Theory and a three-level meta-analysis. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 37, 36-51.

Define how the team will communicate with each other and share

Project Name / Team / Description
Working as a team you are to
• Agree on a suitable team name. list all team members and provide their contact details in a professional looking document.
• Provide an overview of the project on which you are working.
• Complete a project description. This should be written clearly and concisely so that anyone unfamiliar with the project can fully understand the objectives.
Team Charter
After your team agrees on a team name and identified all of the contact details of your team members. address the following points and present them in a professional looking document:
• Skills and Knowledge Inventory — List the specific knowledge and / or skills that each team member can contribute to the project. This could be technical knowledge. communication or leadership skills.
• Roles and Responsibilities — Define roles and responsibilities for each team member. This can be defined for entire project or can be shared or even rotated.
• Team Communications
o Meeting Times & Location —Agree on mutually convenient times and location to convene to work on the case assignments.
o Define how the team will communicate with each other and share information custom paper writing and editing service . Also specify how meetings will be documented and where subsequent resources will be stored for ease of access.
• Team Rules & Expectations
o Discuss your previous experiences of working in teams. both positive and negative. What is the overall team goal?
o Team Values — Discuss as a team what values are important. Develop a statement or itemised list that summarises these values.
o Code of Ethics — Based on your team values. create a statement that summarises a code of ethics to guide your team’s ethical behaviour.
o Rules and Expectations — Build a set of rules and expectation that all members of the team shall abide by. Consider team decisions. conflict. absence from meetings. and an individual’s lack of contribution for example.
• Signatures — Get each member of the team to sign the team charter. This will indicate an understanding and agreement to the rules and expectations as specified in the points above.
Part Two:
Learning Cycles
Learning cycles give structure to your team meetings and accountability for when you and your team work outside of the meeting schedule
Firstly. prior to your next meeting. assign roles to the team. There should only be two central roles — the organiser and the scribe:
• Organiser — organises the meeting by writing down the team’s ideas and then distributes them to the team for feedback.
• Scribe — documents the ideas and action points going forward.
Note: Roles should be rotated for each meeting and assigned so that everyone on the team has equal responsibility.
Using peer learning and reflections. document your understanding of the project at this point in time in a table format.
Part Two:
Learning Cycles
Learning cycles give structure to your team meetings and accountability for when you and your team work outside of the meeting schedule
Firstly. prior to your next meeting. assign roles to the team. There should only be two central roles — the organiser and the scribe:
• Organiser — organises the meeting by writing down the team’s ideas and then distributes them to the team for feedback.
• Scribe — documents the ideas and action points going forward.
Note: Roles should be rotated for each meeting and assigned so that everyone on the team has equal responsibility.
Using peer learning and reflections. document your understanding of the project at this point in time in a table format.
Note: it is likely at this early stage of the project that you will write down very few facts. You will have a few more assumptions and probably a larger list of questions to be answered. Seek answers to your questions. however do not update this table later in the project.
Part Three:
Communication Plan
As a team. brainstorm and identify all stakeholders to the project. Then individually. develop an appropriate communication plan.
Part Four: 550 words
Researching for the closure checklist and project evaluation
a. To prepare for this task. you will be required to provide an annotated bibliography.
Write an Annotated Bibliography for three (3) relevant texts or readings around project evaluation. The Annotated Bibliography is a critical examination of the most relevant recent and scholarly research on the topic area that is not just a summary of the articles you have read.
You will submit this as an appendix to your project evaluation documentation.
Ensure that the AB submitted by you is your own work and has not been submitted elsewhere and comply with the University’s requirements for academic integrity.
Use the following resource to guide you around the research tools:
http://student.csu.edu.aul data/assets/pdf file/0009/186444/annotate1.pdf
http://libguides.csu.edu.au/itc
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a. To prepare for this task. you will be required to provide an annotated bibliography.
Write an Annotated Bibliography for three (3) relevant texts or readings around project evaluation. The Annotated Bibliography is a critical examination of the most relevant recent and scholarly research on the topic area that is not just a summary of the articles you have read.
You will submit this as an appendix to your project evaluation documentation.
Ensure that the AB submitted by you is your own work and has not been submitted elsewhere and comply with the University’s requirements for academic integrity.
Use the following resource to guide you around the research tools:
http://student.csu.edu.au/ data/assets/pdf file/0009/186444/annotate1.pdf
http://libguides.c su.edu.au/itc
b. Develop a closure checklist that the project team will use to ensure that the project has been closed properly.
c. Develop a project evaluation —outline and discuss how your project’s MOV will be evaluated.
Part Five: 500 words
Reflection
Write a brief reflection of no more than 500 words of your team work experience in this subject. To guide your reflection you should address the following questions:
• How did your experience compare to your understanding of the leadership qualities required to successfully lead a project?
• Based on your experience, what are necessary techniques. skills. methods and ICT project professional custom paper writing and editing service manager requires in the IT profession?
Rationale
This assessment meets the following learning outcomes:
• be able to identify, critically analyse. reflect on and synthesise the key elements of the IT project management framework, including project stakeholders. communication management. the project management knowledge areas. common tools and techniques. and project success factors:
• be able to critically analyse the role of IT project management within a professional workplace. from the viewpoint of the member/leader of the project team:
• be able to research and critically evaluate how a practising IT project manager applies IT project management techniques. project management skills. methods and software tools in the IT industry:
• be able to understand and apply appropriate communication practices within a project management context:
• be able to research and apply established IT project management principles. skills and techniques to a case study.

ITSA 2005 Planning and Implementing Server Project Assignment

ITSA 2005
Planning and Implementing Server
Project Assignment
September 2018
Due Date: Tuesday, 16th of October 2018
Total Marks: 25 (15 report + 10 presentation)
This assessment item requires you to work in a group of 4 students.
Task:
Your task is to consider the given scenario and create a proposal in a form of a project report that addresses the given requirements.
The report should be prepared using Microsoft Office documents and it should be uploaded on to Moodle as a Microsoft WORD document. The word limit of the report is 2000 words. The word count should not include the contents in the Cover Page, Table of Contents, Executive summary, List of References and the contents in the Appendix.
The report should be a properly constructed academic report. It should contain an effective introduction, body and conclusion. A reference list formatted in the Harvard style is required, at the end of the report.
Submission guidelines:
The report should have a consistent, professional, and well-organized appearance.
1. Your report should include the following:
? The cover page must identify all group member details, including student names and the ID numbers, course details, and the assignment details.
? The assignment must use 12-point font size and at least single line spacing with appropriate section headings.
? The report must include executive summary, table of contents, introduction, discussions with headings and sub-headings to address the requirements given, conclusions, recommendations, references and appendices.
? Any supporting material, including diagrams, charts etc. could be included in an appendix attached at the end of the report.
? In-text referencing in Harvard style must be cited in the text of the report and listed appropriately at the end in a reference list.
2. The report must be submitted in soft (electronic) copy as a Microsoft Word document via the upload link available on Moodle.
Project Overview:
You are a new administrator for the Contoso Corporation, which is a leading producer of smart devices for homes. You need to develop an automated installation strategy.
The Contoso Corporation design team is close to finishing up a new product for home security monitoring and medical monitoring equipment. As a new administrator, you are called into your manager’s office to discuss this exciting new project. He explains that the product is centered around a server that collects and analyzes information from wireless nodes around the house or worn by an individual. To keep track of data, the server will use Windows Internal Database (WID). As part of the rollout, hundreds of servers will need to be prepared for the product rollout and additional servers will be needed to replace sold inventory.
Your manager wants you to design a solution that can create hundreds of new servers each month. You must work with the design team to create an automated server installation plan that will support this project. The servers will have to be tested by the quality control team before being shipped to customers.
The manager also points out that the Contoso investors are acquiring another company, Adatum
Corporation, which has three large sites each consisting of 500 to 1000 users. The headquarter office in Melbourne has the majority of application services, such as Microsoft Exchange and SQL servers. Adatum also has 20 smaller sites consisting of 25 to 50 users each. Your manager is asking for your proposal on redesigning the network infrastructure of Aadatum, specifically the deployment and configuration of domain controllers.
Create a proposal that includes the following sections:
? Purpose of the Project
? Requirements of the Project
? The Proposed Solution
?
?
When writing the proposal, you must explain the reasoning behind your choices.
In working on this proposal, you may need to refer to Lab assignments in which you were asked to complete and submit as part of formative assessments in this course. You should use those labs as a guide in preparing this proposal.
Submit your proposal as a report according to the requirements and guidelines explained above.

Psychology 90A Research method

Psychology 90A Research method
1. Worth 1 point
Develop a theory about people’s behavior in an area you know a lot about (e.g., sports, video games, being a college student). Then develop a theory about people’s behavior in a domain that you do not know a lot about. Make sure that you are clear on the difference between a theory and a hypothesis, and you provide theories (not hypotheses). Theories explain a set of phenomena, whereas hypotheses are predictions. Example of a theory about hookups: Due to differences in biological investment in reproduction, men and women have different preferences for short term mating. Example of a hypothesis about hookups (NOT a theory): Men will be more likely to report enjoying a one-night stand than women. DO NOT USE THE EXAMPLE PROVIDED HERE. YOU NEED TO COME UP WITH YOUR OWN EXAMPLES.
Notice what guides your theory development:
• Which theory was guided most by data you have observed?
• Which theory was more guided by intuitions?
• Use the theory-data cycle to reflect on how data inform theory development. Which theory—the one you developed in your area of expertise or the one you developed in an area you don’t know much about—do you think is more likely to be supported by empirical research?
2. Worth 1 point
Identify the references below as examples of journal articles, chapters in edited books, full-length books written for other psychologists, or trade books. If they are journal articles, are they empirical or review articles?
Klintsova, A. Y., Dickson, E., Yoshida, R., & Greenough, W. T. (2004). Altered expression of BDNF and its high-affinity receptor TrkB in response to complex motor learning and moderate exercise. Brain Research, 1028, 92-104.
Intraub, H. (2007). Scene perception: The world through a window. In M.A. Peterson, B. Gillam, & H.A. Sedgwick (Eds.), In the mind’s eye: Julian Hochberg on the perception of pictures, films, and the world (pp. 454-466). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
Kindlon, D., & Thomas, M. (1999). Raising Cain: Protecting the emotional life of boys. New York, NY: Ballantine books.
Johnson, S. K. (2008). Medically unexplained illness: Gender and biopsychosocial implications. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
3. Worth 1 point
3-Imagine you encounter each of the following headlines. First, classify each headline as a frequency, association or causal claim. Second, what questions would you ask if you wanted to understand more about the study behind the headline? For each of your questions, indicate which of the four validities your question is addressing.
a. Kids with ADHD more likely to bully.
b. Breastfeeding boosts children’s IQs.
c. Half of college students have sexted.
4. Worth 1point
The following headlines make frequency claims. For each (a) identify the measured variable in the claim, (b) speculate about the way that variable might have been operationalized, and (c) post a specific question that you could ask about the construct validity of the measured variable.
Survey: 41% of employers more often promote people who dress better
Sleeping at work: more of us are doing it
Study tracks prevalence of eating disorders

Psychology 90A Research method

Question 1
Theory: Considering the change in lifestyles in the modern world, many young teenagers are engaging in sex at a very age. The change in lifestyles includes the use of social media such as facebook that leads to erosion of cultures. Surveys indicate that the number of young children engaging in sex has been increasing over last ten years. The reports suggest that the introduction of technological devices and televisions has encouraged early sexual behavior. Such changes expose children to adverse behaviors causing them to engage in sex at young age.
Hypothesis: Today, many young children are reported to engage in sex than children in the past 10 years. It indicates that children in the modern society have more desire to engage in sex compared to the children in the past. However, it only offers a suggestion without any explanations of the occurrences. Thus, there should be a study to determine why children in the current generations are likely to engage in sex than the children in the old generation.
Question 2
Klintsova, A. Y., Dickson, E., Yoshida, R., & Greenough, W. T. (2004). Altered expression of BDNF and its high-affinity receptor TrkB in response to complex motor learning and moderate exercise.Brain Research, 1028, 92-104. It is a journal article, in which it is a reviewed journal article.
Intraub, H. (2007). Scene perception: The world through a window. In M.A. Peterson, B. Gillam, & H.A. Sedgwick (Eds.), In the mind’s eye: Julian Hochberg on the perception of pictures, films, and the world (pp. 454-466). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. It is a chapter in edited books.
Kindlon, D., & Thomas, M. (1999). Raising Cain: Protecting the emotional life of boys. New York, NY: Ballantine books. It is a trade book.
Johnson, S. K.(2008). Medically unexplained illness: Gender and biopsychosocial implications. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. It indicates a full-length book written for other psychologists.
Question 3
a. Kids with ADHD more likely to bully. It is an association claim.
b. Breastfeeding boosts children’s IQs. It is a causal claim.
c. Half of college students have sexted. It is a frequency claim.
The first question consists of statistical validity as it depends on the data collected during a research on the issues in question. The second question reflects internal validity. While the third question is exemplifies construct validity, since it shows the variables can be manipulated in research work. If I wanted to understand more about the study, I would ask a question on how breastfeeding boosts children’s IQs. The question would seek to obtain detailed findings on how the variable of breastfeeding influences the IQ of children.
Question 4
a) The measured variable is explained in the first question about 41% of employers more often promote people who dress better. The estimation of 41% reveals the measuring of the variable on people’s dressing.
b) The variable can be operationalized by identifying the relevant concepts. The next step is obtaining among the different quantitative measures relating to the concepts of the variables. Most importantly, the identification of the techniques of obtaining the measures assists in the operationalization of the variables.
c) How did the researcher determine that only 41 per of employers more often promote people who dress better?

Write an Op-Ed (opinion-editorial) that allows you to demonstrate an understanding of how issues relating to the dignity of the human person

ASSIGNMENT 2
Write an Op-Ed (opinion-editorial) that allows you to demonstrate an understanding of how issues relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the common good may be addressed by you in your professional practice now and in the future.
You will need to select one issue from the list below that relates to the degree program you are studying and write a concise but persuasive opinion piece on this issue relating to the dignity of the human person and the realisation of the common good that relates to your professional practice now and in the future
List of issues:
-not improving access to health centres or hospitals
-the challenge of radicalization
-climate change and the threat to coastal communities (the role of science or education or the arts or
law or business, etc.)
-social inequality (and the role of education or the arts or science or the humanities, and so on)
-violence in schools
-victimization online
-the proliferation of nuclear weapons
-fake news
-internet addiction and its negative impact on communities
-the failure to recognize Australia’s First Peoples in the Constitution
-Australians living in poverty
-the -crisis- in youth justice
General Instructions:
• Create an evocative and engaging Op-Ed that applies insights from Assessment 1 (knowledge
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base) to an issue or problem relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the
common good that relates to your professional practice now and in the
future (i.e., the degree program you are studying).
• The Op-Ed should clearly explain to readers what the issue or problem is (in order to achieve a pass grade or better, you must choose an issue from the list above) and how your understanding of the knowledge you have acquired in the unit addresses the issue or problem and relates to the discipline area you are studying in. Please note that you do not have to come up with the ‘definitive solution’ bu• provide a well-argued view in order to move forward on the issue.
The Op-Ed is to be no more than 700 words long; penalties will apply for assessmentsthat exceed the word limit or which are submitted late: please see the assessment overview and instructions on LEO.
• The idea is to express your thoughts clearly and concisely and make your argument as directly as you can — just like a journalist or writer. Do not assume that this assignment is
easy given the word length. The challenge is to present a persuasive argum, nr
and concise manner.
Although Op-Eds do not usually require referencing, for this academic work
and full referencing is required.
References do not count in the word limit

UNCC100: Self and Community: Exploring the Anatomy of Modern Society

UNCC100: Self and Community: Exploring the Anatomy of Modern Society
UNIT OUTLINE
Credit points: 10
Prerequisites: Nil
Incompatible units: UNCC301, UNCC302
Who to contact:
1. Questions about the unit: yourTutor
2. Tutorial selection or clash:CoreCurriculum.Student@acu.edu.au
3. Educational Inclusion Plan: Faculty Academic Liaison (See your Faculty contact below)
4. Request for Extension: Faculty Academic Liaison (See your Faculty contact below)
5. Request for Special Consideration: FacultyAcademic Liaison (See your Facultycontact
below)
6. Other enquiry: CoreCurriculum.Student@acu.edu.au
Faculty Academic Liaison (Education & Arts)
Mr. Roger Hillman (FEA.CoreCurriculum@acu.edu.au)
Faculty Academic Liaison (Health Sciences)
Ms. Laurine Hurley (FHS.CoreCurriculum@acu.edu.au)
Faculty Academic Liaison (Law & Business)
Dr. Sr. Thuy-Linh Nguyen (FLB.CoreCurriculum@acu.edu.au)
Faculty Academic Liaison (Theology & Philosophy):
Dr Richard Colledge (FTP.CoreCurriculum@acu.edu.au)
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Unit rationale, description and aim:
Is polluting our environment done for the common good?
Does perpetuating discrimination respect the dignity of the individual?
These are just two examples of the many real challenges we face as individuals functioning as
members of our community. They highlight the fact that as humans, we are all individuals, and yet
none of us lives in isolation. The African concept of ‘ubuntu’ is helpful here: I am what I am, because
of who we are – this concept is consistent with the principles of Catholic social thought.
Understanding these principles helps us to determine how issues relating to the dignity of the
human person and the realization of the common good may be addressed in our personal and
professional lives now and in the future.
This knowledge and understanding is a foundation for the development of the skills needed to be
able to propose ways to address challenges where shared responsibility for the common good is not
being realized. Given the pervasiveness of such problems in our community, addressing this need is
important to our success as a community in realizing a more just world – and your role as an
individual who can, and must, be part of that.
Therefore, this unit will aim to equip you with knowledge and understanding of the ideas of “self” and
“community” as interrelated concepts and develop basic skills to enable you to contribute to a more
just society.
Mode/attendance pattern:
This unit is offered in multi-mode. This means you are required to complete activities in LEO prior
to face-to-face classes. The activities are designed to support your completion of the assessment
tasks. It is vital to the successful completion of the unit that you engage in both these learning
modes.
Duration:
10 week semester. You should anticipate undertaking 90 hours of study for this unit, including
class attendance, readings and assignment preparation. This unit is the first of two units which
are part of the University Core Curriculum.
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LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this unit, you should be able to:
1. Describe coherently in writing the principles of Catholic Social Thought (CST), and
through a personal written commentary on each one, explain how the concepts of’self’
and ‘community’ areinterrelated.
2. Analyse and evaluate the principles of CST in order to write an argument that shows how
issues relating to the dignity of the human person and the realisation of the common good
may be addressed by you in your professional practice (i.e. the degree program you are
studying) now and in thefuture.
GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES
Each unit in your course contributes in some way to the development of the ACU Graduate
Attributes which you should demonstrate by the time you complete your course. You can view the
ACU Graduate Attributes for all courses at http://www.acu.edu.au/204356. All Australian universities
have their expected Graduate Attributes – ACU’s Graduate Attributes have a greater emphasis on
ethical behaviour and community responsibility than those of many other universities. All of your
units will enable you to develop some attributes.
On successful completion of this unit, you should have developed your ability to:
GA1 demonstrate respect for the dignity of each individual and for human diversity
GA2 recognise your responsibility to the common good, the environmentand society
GA4 think critically andreflectively
GA7 work both autonomously andcollaboratively
GA8 locate, organise, analyse, synthesise and evaluateinformation
GA9 demonstrate effective communication in oral and written English language andvisualmedia
CONTENT
Topics will include:
 The Good Life and the GoldenRule
 I am because we are; the individual andsociety
 The history and principles of Catholic socialthought
 Human flourishing and the commongood
 The common good
• Case study: challenges to the common good – freedoms and thecommongood
 Advocacy: personal and professional challenges of Catholic social teaching
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QUALITY ASSURANCE AND STUDENT FEEDBACK
This unit has been evaluated through the ‘Student Evaluation of Learning and Teaching’ (SELT) online
surveys.
The following changes have been made:
-we have revised and updated the assessments
-we have revised and updated the marking rubrics
-we have included e-readings (recommended) on LEO
SELT surveys are usually conducted at the end of the teaching period. Your practical and constructive
feedback is valuable to improve the quality of the unit. Please ensure you complete the SELT survey
for the unit. You can also provide feedback at other times to the unit lecturers, course coordinators
and/or through student representatives.
TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
This unit is delivered in:
 face-to-face mode over a 10-week period in a normal universitysemester;
 an intensive mode over 2 sets of 2 days in Winter and SummerTerms;and,
 an online mode.
Face-to-face and intensive modes adopt a ‘flipped class room’ approach with no lectures. Small group
classes of one hour’s duration are adopted with ‘active learning’ techniques being used as opposed
to a didactic method. Active learning methods may include but are not limited to the use of facilitated
group discussions; ice-breakers; buzz groups; role play and advocacy.
All resources are electronically based and available through the LMS.
SCHEDULE
For the most up-to-date information, please check your LEO unit and also note advice from your
lecturing and tutoring staff for changes to this schedule.
Week Starting Weekly topics and class activities Preparation and other
important information
1 July 29 Introduction to UNCC100
Ice breaker
Read Unit Outline
2 August 5
The history and principles of
Catholic Social thought (I)
Unpacking of the principles
➢ DignityoftheHumanPerson;
➢ Common Good;
➢ Preferential option for the
poor; Subsidiarity
Complete Module 3 in
LEO
The history and
principles of Catholic
Social thought
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3 August 12 The history and principles of
Catholic Social thought (II)
Unpacking of the principles
 Universal Purpose of Goods;
 Stewardship of Creation;
 Promotion of Peace
 Participation
 Global solidarity
Complete Module 3 in
LEO
The history and
principles of Catholic
Social thought
4 August 19
I am because we are; individual
and society
Ubuntu – Group discussion
Because We’re Happy – buzz
groups activity
Complete Module 2 in
LEO
The history and
principles of Catholic
Social thought
5 August 26
The Good Life and the Golden
Rule
Assessment 1 due August 26, 4am
Review Module 1 in LEO
The Good Life and
the Golden Rule
6 September 2
Human Flourishing and the
Common Good
Human Flourishing and Reciprocity
– discussion and group activity
Complete Module 4 in
LEO
Human Flourishing and
the Common Good
7 September 9
The Common Good
Understanding the common good
and inequality
Complete Module 5 in
LEO
The Common Good
8 September 16
Case study – challenges to the
common good – freedoms and
the common good
Read Case Study
Handouts provided in LEO
under Week 8 Resources
9 September 23
Advocacy – personal and
professional challenges of
Catholic social thought
“Where do my clothes come from?”
(activity)
Complete Module 6 in
LEO
• Advocacy – personal and
professional challenges of
Catholic social teaching
• Bring an item of clothing
or other item and conduct
research on it for this
week’s classroom activity
Page 6 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
September 30 Vacation week
10 October 7 Unit “wrap-up”.
Q and A for Op-Ed.
What to expect in UNCC300.
October 14 Assessment 2 due 4am
ASSESSMENT STRATEGY AND RATIONALE
Assessment tasks Due date Weighting
(%)
Learning
outcome/
s
assessed
Graduate Attributes
assessed
Feature Article 26 August
4am 50% 1 GA1, GA4, GA7, GA8,
GA9
Op Ed piece 14 October 4am 50% 2 GA2, GA4, GA7, GA8,
GA9
In order to pass this unit, you are required to achieve a final grade of 50% or better as an
aggregate score of all points from assessment tasks completed in this unit.
The assessment tasks for this unit are designed for you to demonstrate your achievement of
each learning outcome
ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION, MARKING AND RETURN
Assessments will be submitted and returned electronically through LEO
Word limits
Students may exceed the word limit on assessments by 10% without penalty. However, the
marking penalty for exceeding the word limit by more than 10% will be calculated in this way: 5%
of the total available marks for the assessment will be deducted from the student’s mark for each
further 10% by which the number of words in the student’s assessment exceeds the limit.
ASSIGNMENT 1
(Feature article)
Choose 3-5 principles of Catholic Social Thought (CST),
1) state, define and describe thesecoherently;
2) explain “self” and “community”, and 3-5 ways in which they are interrelated (with reference
to the 3-5 principles you have chosen)
Page 7 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
Due date: 26 August 4am
Weighting: 50%
Length and/or format: 1000-1200
Purpose: Write a feature article explaining principles of Catholic
Social Thought (CST), and how the concepts of “self”
and “community” are interrelated.
Learning outcomes assessed: 1. Describe coherently in writing the principlesof Catholic
Social Thought (CST), and through a personal written commentary, explain how the
concepts of “self” and “community” areinterrelated.
How to submit: Your feature article must be uploaded to LEO via Turnitin.
Return of assignment: Assignments will be returned on 10 September, providing
feedback for preparation of assignment 2.
Assessment criteria:
A rubric outlining the criteria you will be marked on and the standard for each criterion
required to achieve each grade for Assignment 1 is attached below.
HD
85-100
DI
75-84
CR
65-74
PA
50-64
NN
0-49
States 3-5 Catholic
Social Thought
Principles
(4 marks)
States 3-5 Catholic
Social Thought
Principles
accurately.
Fails to state 3- 5
Catholic Social
Thought Principles.
Defines 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought Principles
(8 marks)
Defines 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought
Principles in great
detail; clarifies
and elaborates.
Shows deep
engagement with
the module
materials well
beyond the level of
class discussion
Defines 3-5 Catholic
Social Thought
Principles in detail;
clarifies and
elaborates.
Shows much
evidence of
engagement with
the module
materials beyond
the level of class
discussion
Defines 3-5 Catholic
Social Thought
Principles in some
detail; clarifies.
Shows evidence of
engagement with the
module materials
beyond the level of
class discussion
Defines 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought
Principles in a
basic way.
Response would
have benefitted
from more
clarification or
accuracy.
Fails to define 3- 5
Catholic Social
Thought Principles
(definitions of the
principles are
generally unclear,
vague, or
inaccurate).
Coherently
describes 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought
Principles
(16 marks)
Exemplary, coherent
clear and accurate
description of 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought Principles.
Shows deep and
considered
engagement with
module materials;
may show personal
insight or original
thought.
Describes 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought Principles
very coherently
clearly and
accurately
Shows evidence of
deep engagement
with the module
materials beyond
the level of class
discussion.
Describes 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought Principles
coherently clearly
and accurately.
Shows evidence of
engagement with the
module materials
beyond the level of
class discussion.
Describes 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought Principles
coherently, and in a
largely clear and
accurate way.
Response would
have benefitted from
more clarification,
concrete
explanation or
examples, or more
evidence of
engagement with
unit materials.
Fails to describe
coherently 3- 5
Catholic Social
Thought
Principles
(descriptions
of the
principles are
generally very
vague, or
inaccurate).
Through personal
written
commentary
drawing on 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought principles,
explains how these
help us to
understand “self”
(3 marks)
Provides with
exemplary accuracy
and clarity and
coherence a
personal written
commentary on the
chosen Catholic
Social Thought
principles, explaining
how these help us to
understand “self”
Provides a very
accurate and clear
personal written
commentary on the
chosen Catholic
Social Thought
principles,
explaining how
these help us to
understand “self”
Provides an
accurate and clear
personal written
commentary on the
chosen Catholic
Social Thought
principles,
explaining how
these help us to
understand “self”
Provides
personal written
commentary on
the chosen
Catholic Social
Thought
principles,
explaining how
these help us to
understand “self”
Fails to explain
how the chosen
principles of
Catholic Social
Thought help us to
understand “self”
Page 8 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
HD
85-100
DI
75-84
CR
65-74
PA
50-64
NN
0-49
Through personal
written commentary
drawing on 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought principles,
explains how these
principles help us to
understand
“community”
(3 marks)
Provides with
exemplary accuracy
and clarity a
personal written
commentary on the
chosen Catholic
Social Thought
principles, explaining
how the chosen
principles help us to
understand
“community”
Provides a very
accurate and clear
personal written
commentary on the
chosen Catholic
Social Thought
principles,
explaining how the
chosen principles
help us to
understand
“community”
Provides an accurate
and clear personal
written commentary
on the chosen
Catholic Social
Thought principles,
explaining how the
chosen principles
help us to understand
“community”
Provides personal
written commentary
on the chosen
Catholic Social
Thought principles,
explaining how the
chosen principles
help us to
understand
“community”
Fails to explain how
the chosen
principles of
Catholic Social
Thought help us to
understand
“community”
Through personal
written
commentary
drawing on 3-5
Catholic Social
Thought
principles,
explains how the
principles help us
to understand the
interrelationship
between ‘self’ and
‘community’
(6 marks)
Provides with
exemplary clarity
and coherence a
personal written
commentary on the
chosen Catholic
Social Thought
principles,
explaining how the
chosen principles
help us to
understand the
interrelationship
between ‘self’ and
‘community’”
Provides a very
clear and coherent
personal written
commentary on the
chosen Catholic
Social Thought
principles,
explaining how the
chosen principles
help us to
understand the
interrelationship
between ‘self’ and
‘community’
Provides a clear and
coherent personal
written commentary
on the chosen
Catholic Social
Thought principles,
explaining how the
chosen principles
help us to
understand the
interrelationship
between ‘self’ and
‘community’
Provides largely
clear and coherent
personal written
commentary on the
chosen Catholic
Social Thought
principles,
explaining how the
chosen principles
help us to
understand the
interrelationship
between ‘self’ and
‘community’
Fails to explain how
the chosen principles
of Catholic Social
Thought help us to
understand the
interrelationship
between ‘self’ and
‘community’
Style and Writing
Mechanics
(5 marks)
Presents all
information clearly
in a highly
engaging style
with no errors in
grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation and
spelling
Presents
information
clearly, overall,
in a very
engaging style
with occasional
or no errors in
grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation and
spelling.
Presents
information
clearly overall, in
an engaging
style with
occasional
errors in
grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation and
spelling.
Presents
information
clearly, overall,
with few errors in
grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation and
spelling.
Presents information
unclearly Many
errors in grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation and
spelling, in general.
Referencing
(5 marks) Exemplary
citation.
Provides entirely
accurate
information about
all sources used
Accurately cites
all sources of
information,
provides
accurate
information
about all sources
used
Sources are
cited accurately
and student
provides
accurate
information
about the
sources used, in
general.
Sources are
cited and
student provides
information
about sources
used, in general.
No referencing or
sources not cited
accurately
throughout.
Readings for this assessment:
The readings from tutorials 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the unit available to you via the LEO (i.e. Module 1 –
The Good Life and the Golden Rule; Module 2 – I am because we are; individual and society; Module 3
– The history and principles of Catholic Social thought; and through any wider or further reading you
wish to include (optional: you MAY wish to include Module 4 – Human Flourishing and the Common
Good which we will cover in week 6, but this is NOT required).
Please note that you are not required to read outside of the reading list in the unit in order to
achieve a high distinction in this assessment task.
General Instructions:
Page 9 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
• Construct a feature article stating, defining and describing, in writing, 3-5 principles of Catholic Social
Thought (CST) as outlined in the unit; explain the inter-relationship between “self” and “community”
(with reference to 3-5 principles of Catholic Social Thought that you have chosen)
• The 9 principles are: the Dignity of the Human Person; the Common Good; the Preferential
Option for the Poor; Subsidiarity; the Universal Purpose of Goods; the Stewardship of Creation; the
Promotion of Peace; Participation; Global Solidarity.
• From this assessment you will receive constructive feedback to assist you in completing assessment 2
• The article is to be between 1,000-1,200 words in length; penalties will apply for assessments that exceed
the word limit and also for late submissions: please see the assessment overview and instructions on
LEO.
• The feature article may have illustrations/artwork that relate to the content of your article. Try and make
your article interesting and engaging for readers.
• All material must be referenced, if it is not original (see the notes on the UNCC100 LEO page for how to
reference according to your discipline area).
• References do not count in the word limit.
• This assessment will be worth 50 marks.
• Please see the General Instructions on LEO for this assessment
ASSIGNMENT 2
Write an Op-Ed (opinion-editorial) that allows you to demonstrate an understanding of how
issues relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the common good
may be addressed by you in your professional practice now and in the future.
You will need to select one issue from the list below that relates to the degree program you are
studying and write a concise but persuasive opinion piece on this issue relating to the dignity of
the human person and the realisation of the common good that relates to your professional
practice now and in the future
List of issues:
-not improving access to health centres or hospitals
-the challenge of radicalization
-climate change and the threat to coastal communities (the role of science or education or the arts or
law or business, etc.)
-social inequality (and the role of education or the arts or science or the humanities, and so on)
-violence in schools
-victimization online
-the proliferation of nuclear weapons
-fake news
-internet addiction and its negative impact on communities
-the failure to recognize Australia’s First Peoples in the Constitution
-Australians living in poverty
-the “crisis” in youth justice
General Instructions:
• Create an evocative and engaging Op-Ed that applies insights from Assessment 1 (knowledge
Page 10 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
base) to an issue or problem relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the
common good that relates to your professional practice now and in the
future (i.e., the degree program you are studying).
• The Op-Ed should clearly explain to readers what the issue or problem is (in order to achieve a pass
grade or better, you must choose an issue from the list above) and how your understanding of the
knowledge you have acquired in the unit addresses the issue or problem and relates to the discipline
area you are studying in. Please note that you do not have to come up with the ‘definitive solution’ but
provide a well-argued view in order to move forward on the issue.
 The Op-Ed is to be no more than 700 words long; penalties will apply for assessmentsthat
exceed the word limit or which are submitted late: please see the assessment overview and
instructions onLEO.
• The idea is to express your thoughts clearly and concisely and make your argument as
directly as you can – just like a journalist or writer. Do not assume that this assignment is
easy given the word length. The challenge is to present a persuasive argument in a clear
and concise manner.
 Although Op-Eds do not usually require referencing, for this academic work correct
and full referencing is required.
 References do not count in the wordlimit.
 See referencing guidelines on the UNCC100 LEO page (You can find it under
Assessment>How do I reference course materials for UNCC units?).
• This assessment will be worth 50 marks.
• Please see the instructions on LEO also for thisassessment
Readings for this assessment: The readings of the unit available to you via LEO and through any
wider or further reading you wish to include. Please note that you are not required to read outside of the
reading list in the unit in order to achieve a high distinction in this assessment task.
Further, you should read the articles on LEO that explain more fully what an Op-Ed piece is before
commencing this assessed task.
Due date: 14 October 4am
Weighting: 50%
Length and/or format: 700 words
Purpose: to write an Op-Ed (opinion-editorial) thatallows the
student to demonstrate an understandingof how issues
relating to the dignity of the human person and the
realization of the common good
may be addressed by them in their professional
practice now and in the future.
Page 11 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
Learning outcomes assessed: analyse and evaluate the principles ofCST in
order to write an argument that shows how issues relating to the dignity of the
human person and the realisation of the common good may be addressed by
you in your professional practice (i.e. the degree program you are studying) now
and in the future.
How to submit: The Op-Ed piece must be uploaded to LEO via
Turnitin.
Return of assignment: Assignments will be returned via LEO when
final grades arereleased.
If you are unsure how to find your assignment results and feedback you can
read how to do this on LEO under Assessment > How to find your results and
feedback
Assessment criteria: The following table lists the criteria youwill be
marked on and the standard for each criterion required to achieve each grade for
Assignment 2.
HD
85-100
DI
75-84
CR
65-74
PA
50-64
NN
1. On the
principle of the
dignity of the
human person
(10 marks)
Provides a clear and
accurate definition and
an entirely coherent
account of human dignity
supported by deep
engagement with the
module materials
beyond the level of class
discussion
Provides a clear and
accurate definition
and a very coherent
account of human
dignity supported by
detailed engagement
with the module
materials beyond the
level of class
discussion
Provides a clear and
accurate definition
and a coherent
account of human
dignity, supported by
engagement with the
module materials
beyond the level of
class discussion
Provides a clear and
accurate definition
and a largely
coherent account of
human dignity
Fails to provide a
clear and accurate
definition and an
account of human
dignity
2. On the
principle of the
common good
(10 marks)
Provides a clear and
accurate definition and
an entirely coherent
account of the common
good supported by deep
engagement with the
module materials beyond
the level of class
discussion
Provides a clear and
accurate definition and
a very coherentaccount
of the common good
supported by sustained
engagement with the
module materials
beyond the level of
class discussion
Provides a clear and
accurate definition and
a coherent account of
the common good
supported by some
engagement with the
module materials
beyond the level of
class discussion
Provides a clear and
accurate definition
and a largely
coherent account of
the common good
Fails to provide a clear
and accurate definition
and coherent account of
the common good
3. An account of
the issue, chosen
from the list in the
Unit Outline;
related to the
degree program
that the student is
studying
(10 marks)
Provides an entirely clear
and coherent account of
the issue in relation to
their degree program
Provides a clear and
highly coherent
account of the issue in
relation to their degree
program
Provides a clear and
coherent account of the
issue in relation to their
degree program
Provides a clear and
largely coherent
account of the issue
in relation to their
degree program
Fails to provide a clear
and coherent account of
the issue in relation to
their degree program
4. The student’ s
professional
practice, now and
in the future (in
response to the
issue from the list
in the Unit Outline),
in relation to the
dignity of the
human person and
the realization of
the common good
(10 marks)
Provides a clear and
fully coherent account of
professional practice
now and in the future (in
response to the issue
from the list in the Unit
Outline), that relates to
the dignity of the human
person and the
realization of the
common good
Provides a clear and
highly coherent account
of professional practice,
now and in the future (in
response to the issue
from the list in the Unit
Outline), that relates to
the dignity of the human
person and the
realization of the
common good
Provides a clear and
coherent account of
professional practice,
now and in the future (in
response to the issue
from the list in the Unit
Outline), that relates to
the dignity of the human
person and the
realization of the
common good
Provides a clear and
largely coherent
account of professional
practice now and in the
future (in response to
the issue from the list in
the Unit Outline), that
relates to the dignity of
the human person and
the realization of the
common good
Fails to provide a clear
and coherent account of
professional practice,
now and in the future (in
response to the issue
from the list in the Unit
Outline), that relates to
the dignity of the human
person and the
realization of the
common good
Page 12 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
HD
85-100
DI
75-84
CR
65-74
PA
50-64
NN
5. Style and Writing
Mechanics
(5 marks)
Presents all information
clearly and coherently in
a highly engaging style
with no errors in
grammar, capitalization,
punctuation and spelling.
Presents information
clearly and coherently,
overall, in a very
engaging style with
occasional or no errors in
grammar, capitalization,
punctuation and spelling.
Presents information
clearly and coherently,
overall, in an engaging
style with occasional
errors in grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation and spelling.
Presents information
clearly and coherently,
overall, with few errors in
grammar, capitalization,
punctuation and spelling.
Presents information in a
largely unclear way.
Many errors in grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation and spelling,
in general.
6.Ref’g
(5 marks)
Provides fully accurate
information about all
sources used.
Accurately cites all
sources of information,
provides accurate
information about all
sources used
Sources are cited
accurately, and student
provides accurate
information about the
sources used, in general.
Sources are cited and
student provides
information about
sources used, in general.
No referencing or
sources not cited
accurately throughout.
REFERENCING
This unit requires you to use the referencing system used by your
discipline area. See the ‘Academic referencing’ page of the Student
Portal for more details.
ACU POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
It is your responsibility to read and familiarise yourself with ACU policies and
regulations, including regulations on examinations; review and appeals; acceptable
use of IT facilities; and conduct and responsibilities. These are in the ACU
Handbook, available from the website.
A list of these and other important policies can be found at the University
policies page of the Student Portal.
Assessment policy and procedures
You must read the Assessment Policy and Assessment Procedures in the University
Handbook: they include rules on deadlines; penalties for late submission; extensions;
and specialconsideration. If you have any queries on Assessment Policy, please see
your Lecturer in Charge.
Academic integrity
You have the responsibility to submit only work which is your own, or which properly
acknowledges the thoughts, ideas, findings and/or work of others. The Academic
Integrity and Misconduct Policy and the Academic Misconduct Procedures are
available from the website. Please read them, and note in particular that cheating,
plagiarism, collusion, recycling of assignments and misrepresentation are not
acceptable. Penalties for academic misconduct can vary in severity and can include
being excluded from the course.
Turnitin
The Turnitin application (a text-matching tool) will be used in this unit, in order to enable:
 students to improve their academic writing by identifying possible areas of poor
citation and referencing in their written work;and
• teaching staff to identify areas of possible plagiarism in students’ written work.
While Turnitin can help in identifying problems with plagiarism, avoiding plagiarism is
Page 13 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
more important. Information on avoiding plagiarism is available from the Academic
Skills Unit.
For any assignment that has been created to allow submission through Turnitin (check the
Assignment submission details for each assessment task), you should submit your draft well
in advance of the due date (ideally, several days before) to ensure that you have time to
work on any issues identified by Turnitin. On the assignment due date, lecturers will have
access to your final submission and the Turnitin Originality Report.
Please note that electronic marking, Grademark, is used in this unit using Turnitin. Turnitin
will be used as a means of submitting, marking and returning assessment tasks and so a
text matching percentage will appear on your submission automatically.FIRST PEOPLES
AND EQUITY PATHWAYS DIRECTORATE FOR ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT
ISLANDER STUDENTS
Every campus provides information and support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Students. Indigenous Knowings are embedded in curricula for the benefit of all students at
ACU.
STUDENT SUPPORT
If you are experiencing difficulties with learning, life issues or pastoral/spiritual concerns, or
have a disability/medical condition which may impact on your studies, you are advised to
notify your Lecturer in Charge, Course Coordinator and/or one of the services listed below as
soon as possible.
For all aspects of support please visit ACU Info section in the Student Portal.
• Academic Skills offers a variety of services, including workshops (on topics such as
assignment writing, time management, reading strategies, referencing), drop-in
sessions, group appointments and individual consultations. It has a 24-hour online
booking system for individual or groupconsultations.
• Campus Ministry offers pastoral care, spiritual leadership and opportunitiesfor
you tobe involved with community projects.
• The Career Development Service can assist you with finding employment,
preparing a resume and employment application and preparing forinterviews.
• The Counselling Service is a free, voluntary, confidential and non-judgmental
service open to all students and staffed by qualified social workers orregistered
psychologists.
• Disability Services can assist you if you need educational adjustments
because of a disability or chronic medical condition; please contact them as
early aspossible.
Page 14 of 14 Version: 006 16 August 2019
ONLINE RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS
The LEO page for this unit contains further readings/discussion forums.
UNCC100 2019 Semester 2 Ballarat https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=31887
UNCC100 2019 Semester 2 Brisbane https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=31888
UNCC100 2019 Semester 2 Canberra https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=31889
UNCC100 2019 Semester 2 Melbourne https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=31890
UNCC100 2019 Semester 2 North Sydney https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=31891
UNCC100 2019 Semester 2 Strathfield https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=31892
UNCC100 2019 Semester 2 Online https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=31893
REPRESENTATIVE TEXTS AND REFERENCES
1. Witenberg, Rivka, “A Refugee Like Me: Why the Golden Rule Matters in an Era of Mass
Migration”, in The Conversation, 26 November, 2015, at
https://www.dailybulletin.com.au/the-conversation/10183-a-refugee-like-me-why-thegolden-rule-matters-in-an-era-of-mass-migration (4 pages online)
2. United Nations, The United Nations Declaration of Human Rights,
http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html (4 pages online)
3. Pagnucco, Ron and Ensalaco, Mark, “Human Rights, Catholic Social Thought and the Liberal
Rights tradition”, in A Vision of Justice, Edited by Susan Crawford Sullivan and Ron Pagnucco,
Liturgical Press, Collegeville, Minnesota, 2014, pp. 139-160
4. United for Human Rights (UHR),http://www.humanrights.com/what-are-human-rights/briefhistory/declaration-of-independence.html (A Brief History of Human Rights, United for
Human Rights)
There are many other recommended e-readings on LEO.

ICT320 Database Programming Task 2

ICT320
Database Programming
Task 2
ICT320 Database
Programming
T
ask 2
Page 2
Assessment and Submission Details
Marks: 30% of the Total Assessment for the Course
Due Date: Friday 11h59pm Week 12
Submit your assignment to the link under Assessment->Task 2 on Blackboard. The
submission link will be open a week before the due date. Please follow the submission instructions
provided.
The assignment will be marked out of a total of 100 marks and forms 30% of the total
assessment for the course. ALL assignments will be checked for plagiarism by SafeAssign system
provided by Blackboard automatically. THIS IS AN INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT; COLLABORATION
AND DISCUSSION WITH PEERS IS NOT PERMITTED.
Refer to your Course Outline or the Course Web Site for a copy of the “Student Misconduct,
Plagiarism and Collusion” guidelines.
Assignment submission extensions will only be made using the official Faculty of Arts, Business
& Law, University of the Sunshine Coast Guidelines.
Requests for an extension to an assignment MUST be made to the course coordinator prior
to the date of submission and requests made on the day of submission or after the submission date
will only be considered in exceptional circumstances.
Background
Dr. Celine Frere’s research group is based at USC Sippy Downs and studies wild animal
populations to understand how animals evolve and to improve their conservation outcomes. Although
Dr. Frere has contributed to research on a variety of species throughout her career (from giraffes to
porpoises), her research group focuses on three main species: koalas on Australia’s east coast,
eastern water dragons in Brisbane’s Central Business District, and bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay
Western Australia.
The eastern water dragon project is one of the most important projects of Dr. Frere’s research
group. This project was established around Brisbane’s CBD in 2010. These dragons are bigger and
bolder than their non-urban counterparts. They are also diversifying at rates that allow for the study
of evolution in action. Dragons in Brisbane city show significant levels of genetic divergence despite
the small geographic distances between parks (<5 km), and significant differences in morphology
(body size, head and limb shape and forelimb and hindlimb length) depending on the park they reside
in. This project has shown that, like mammals, dragons have preferred associates or “friends”, social
dominance hierarchies, and even share avoidances. Each dragon in the Parkland is identified by a
unique scale pattern around each eye. By studying the behaviour and social networks of these lizards
over their lifespans and across generations, Dr. Frere’s research group is able to investigate questions
about the importance of sociality to health, reproductive success and evolution.
To learn more, go to https://www.celinefrerelab.com/eastern-water-dragons/ .
The Problem
Dr. Frere’s research group has a huge database written and maintained in Microsoft Access
that they wish to port to MySQL. Their database has thousands of records that cover information
about the eastern water dragons such as description, morphology and when they were contacted.
Their database has also a series of views to facilitate complex queries by the numerous researchers
that work within Dr. Frere’s research group.
Unfortunately, their database has only 2 tables. You will be given 2 excel spreadsheets
representing those tables and a subset of their data, and a data dictionary for the table fields. Your
main task is to look at the spreadsheets and propose, justify and implement improvements
to the database to make it more efficient.
Your assignment is in two parts: Part A: Report, Part B: Code.
You are required to submit three files:
__ICT320_PartA.d
ocx
__ICT320_PartB.s
ql
__ICT320_PartB.p
y
You are not to contact Dr. Frere’s research group directly as this takes valuable resources
away from field group. All client communication is to be directed through your lecturer/tutor or via the
course coordinator Mr. Adriano da Silva Marinho.
Please note that all data is copyright and owned by Dr. Celine Frere’s research group and or
USC and is used with their permission for the purposes of this assignment. Further distribution of
this data is not permitted.
For the data dictionary, please refer to the documents “User table and field descriptions.xlsx”
and “Behavioural Surveys 2018.docx”.
Submission Format and Requirements
For Part A you are to include an analysis of the current database design in a word document
or PDF. You should include:
• Identification of major implementation flaws in the existing system, and/or areas
for improvement, including (but not limited to)
o Removing repeated data,
o De-normalization for optimization
o changing some areas to NoSQL (if so, include what type of NoSQL
database).
o Rational for the creation of each specific constraint (Foreign Key and
Unique) and/or index.
• Identification of the current Normal Form of the system.
• An ER Diagram for the current design of the system, and an ER Diagram for
the re-designed system.
• Your assumptions and any supplementary design requirements regarding the
system.
For Part B you are to submit
• A single plain text file, named
__
_ICT320_PartB.sql. In this file you are to include all the SQL for your
database modification. This includes:
o ALTER/CREATE TABLE statements for:
▪ Changes proposed in your redesign from Part A
▪ Commands for the missing FOREIGN KEYs, INDEXes and
UNIQUEness constraints.
o CREATE VIEWs for
▪ Animals vs Date vs Time vs Location: you are to
create a view that lists all the animals that have been contacted
by a researcher. This view should list the animal name, their
contact location, the date and the time.
▪ Number of contacts per animal: you are to create a view
that lists the number of contacts for each animal.
o CREATE PROCEDUREs for
▪ Animal with the greatest number of contacts: You
are to create a procedure that looks into the view described above
and returns, as an output parameter, the animal with the greatest
number of contacts.
▪ Year with the greatest number of contacts: You
are to create a procedure that looks into the database and returns
what was the year where the greatest number of animals was
contacted.
o You need to test your database with some of the data provided to you.
You are free to use any subset but make sure the subset you use
accounts for any constraints you created or assumed. PAY ATTENTION
TO THE DATA DICTIONARY, THERE ARE LEGACY FIELDS THAT
SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN YOUR DESIGN.
• A single plain text file named
__
_ICT320_PartB.py. In this file you are to include the Python for your
programming implementation. This includes:
o Calling and outputting as a single HTML page for each of the views (i.e.
a SELECT * for both views)
o In the same HTML page, calling and outputting the results of the
procedures
o Format the views as tables.
Submission
The completed assignment is to be submitted to Blackboard by the due date of Friday
11h59pm Week 12.
The assignment will be assessed according to the marking rubric. Late submission will be
penalized according to the policy in the course outline. Please note Saturday and Sunday are included
in the count of days late.

ISY1003 Foundations of Programming Assessment Type Practical

Unit ISY1003 Foundations of Programming
Assessment Type Practical
Assessment
Number
2
Assessment
Weighting
Programming Assessment
30%
Alignment with
Unit and Course
Unit Learning Outcome Graduate Attributes Assessed
ULO 3: Describe and discuss the
elements of effective programming style
ULO 4: Demonstrate an understanding of
the software development life cycle and
apply sound programming analysis
techniques (design, coding, debugging,
testing and documentation) to justify
simple programming problems
GA 1: Communication
GA 2: Collaboration
GA 4: Critical Thinking
Due Date/Time
Assessment
Description
Week 10
4 October 2019 via Moodle Turnitin 5:00pm (AEST)
In this project, you will work individually to write programs which demonstrate your
understanding of IPO and usage of simple functions in Python programs.
Content and Structure:
You will have to write a modular program to:
1. Perform a series of transactions
2. This will be a project which students will choose and discuss with the lecturer prior to
commencing.
3. Examples could be a scientific calculator, expense management system, online
shopping system, banking system etc
Program expectation:
 The student must be able to explain the working of the program and its logic.
 Program should be indented, proper comments should be given, modification
history should be present, variable names and data types should be chosen
appropriately.
 The program should compile and execute to display the result.
 The student must use programming constructs available in Python and follow
coding standards.
Detailed
Submission
Requirements
 Multiple program files may be uploaded.
 Student will also need to demonstrate the working of the program along with a full
explanation of the underlying code.
 Follow coding standards, naming conventions for variables and functions.
 Students will be asked to explain the working of their program and the logic they’ve
used.
 Coding should be modular and program should use all the programming constructs
learnt in the course.
Misconduct  The assessment will be submitted through Turnitin via your unit page on Moodle.
 Turnitin is plagiarism software, which will identify if you have copied information
and included it in your assessment.
 Copying information from others (i.e. websites, partner company information, or
other students etc.) without the acknowledging the author is classified as
misconduct.
 Engaging someone else to write any part of your assessment for you outside of the
group work arrangement is classified as misconduct.
 To avoid being charged with Misconduct, students need to submit their own work
and be able to explain the program logic and its working.
 The AIH misconduct policy and procedure can be read on the AIH website
(https://aih.nsw.edu.au/about-us/policies-procedures/).
Late Submission  Any assessment submitted past the specific due date and time will be classified as
Late.
 Any Late submission will be subject to a reduction of the mark allocated for the
assessment item by 5% per day (or part thereof) of the total marks available for the
assessment item. A ‘day’ for this purpose is defined as any day of the week
including weekends. Assignments submitted later than one (1) week after the due
date will not be accepted, unless special consideration is approved as per the
formal process.
Special
consideration
 Students whose ability to submit or attend an assessment item is affected by
sickness, misadventure or other circumstances beyond their control, may be
eligible for special consideration. No consideration is given when the condition or
event is unrelated to the student’s performance in a component of the assessment,
or when it is considered not to be serious.
 Students applying for special consideration must submit the form within 3 days of
the due date of the assessment item or exam.
 The form can be obtained from the AIH website (https://aih.nsw.edu.au/currentstudents/student-forms/) or on-campus at Reception.
 The request form must be submitted to Student Services. Supporting evidence
should be attached. For further information please refer to the Student Assessment
Policy and associated Procedure available on
 (https://aih.nsw.edu.au/about-us/policies-procedures/).
Rubrics Marking Criteria
HD D C P F
ULO 3: Describe and
discuss the elements of
effective programming style
ULO 4: Demonstrate an
understanding of the
software development life
cycle and apply sound
programming analysis
techniques (design, coding,
debugging, testing and
documentation) to justify
simple programming
problems
Program generates output as
expected
Header section has
modification history
Naming conventions are
followed for variables,
functions and other
programming units
(24 – 30 marks)
Program generates output as
expected
Program follows a modular
approach and uses all the
programming constructs
learnt
Functions are used to perform
operations
(18 -24 marks)
Program generates output as
expected
All coding standards are followed
Code is indented
(15 – 18 marks)
Code compiles
Program uses concepts
learnt in class to meet the
requirements
Program implements
business logic
Program generates correct
output
(15 marks)
Code does not compile
Unable to execute code
Program does not perform as per
functionality and features approved by
lecturer
(0 – 14)

Chapter 8 provides a background and detailed analysis of the perspectives on social behavior

Response to Chapter 8
Chapter 8 provides a background and detailed analysis of the perspectives on social behavior. The study of social behavior involves the understanding of how people interact with others. For instance, it provides two theoretical causes of the behaviors in the society. These include proximal and distal causes. While understanding behavior, the chapter offers a detailed discussion on aggressive actions. Aggression is defined as the deliberate actions to harm another person.
Some researchers have suggested it is necessary to understand both the intention and the behavior of the individuals in aggressive situations. Personally, I support the theories of aggression that includes the biological approach, the behaviorist approach, the psychodynamic approach, the humanistic approach, and the cognitive approach (Glassman and Hadad 388). In addition, the chapter is able to recognize the impacts of media encouraging violence behaviors. It suggests the exposures to violent images from the media increases aggressive behavior among the views.
Chapter 8 relates to some current experiments and cases explain the nature and causes of aggressive behavior among people. The Stanford prison experiment is one of the notable physiological experiences of understanding social behavior. Zimbardo the lead psychologist sought to perform an experiment to understand the impacts of becoming a prisoner or a guard (Cherry 2). The experiment found out that power strongly influences the social behavior of people. Powerful people usually possess some control over other persons. Thus, the experiment was a significant in understanding the social behavior in the society.
Hersh explains another similar situation on how “the American soldiers brutalized the Iraqis”(2) that relates to chapter 8. The American soldiers felt that they had the power to act with brutality and aggressively towards the powerless detainees. This explains one of the major causes of aggressive and violent behavior among the humans. People in power or with some authority tend to act aggressively against the powerless individuals within their control. As a result, chapter provides detailed theories, examples and past literatures necessary to understand social behavior.

Works Cited
Glassman. E. William and Hadad, Marilyn. Approaches to psychology, 6th Ed. London, UK: McGraw-Hill, 2013. Print.
Hersh, M. Seymour. Torture at Abu Ghraib. The New Yorker. N.p., 10 May 2014. Web. 5 May 2015. Accessed from .
Cherry, Kendra. The Stanford prison experiment: An experiment in the psychology of imprisonment. About.com. N.p., Web. 5 May 2015. Accessed from .

MacroTest 1. Based on U.S Census Bureau

MacroTest
1.
Based on U.S Census Bureau (2013), the top five nations that have trade surplus with the United States includes HongKong, United Arab Emirates, Netherlands, Switzerland, and Belgium. This explains the current increasing level of the U.S trade deficit. In the last 10 years, the U.S trade surplus was transformed into deficit due to the current global financial crisis.
The trend of trade deficit in the U.S has reduced the amount of wages for skilled workers in the manufacturing sector. This in turn has reduced the amount of wages paid to employees in other sectors. Thus, the United States lost close to 600,000 jobs increasing the level of trade deficit in the economy. Trade deficit recorded from the European countries emerged because of European industrial and agricultural policies. Some of the European nations have limited the amount of exports from the U.S.
Most importantly, the U.S capital accounts are usually favorable if the economy reports trade deficit. The capital account of the United States explains the nature and amount of foreign investment in respective to other foreign countries. The nations with a trade surplus with US do not mean that they have strong trading monopoly over the U.S. However, the capital account perspective suggests that the nations have more investments in the U.S. This places them in a better trading position to obtain increased trading returns compared to the United States’ trade returns. Thus, the capital account is responsible for a considerable amount of trade deficit in the United States economy.
Fig. 1:
Top Five Nations with which the U.S. has a Trade Surplus.
Country Name Surplus in Millions of U.S $ in 2013 Year to Date Surplus in Millions of U.S $
1. Hongkong 2,447.47 11,624.01
2. United Arab Emirates 1,991.64 8,710.97
3. Netherlands 1,648.07 5,633.46
4. Switzerland 1,431.58 1,553.54
5. Belgium 1,325.79 4,182.57

Source: United States. Census Bureau Website (2013)
2.

The Bretton woods conference was conducted in 1994. The main purpose for the conference was to deal with the imminent inters war financial processes that had lead to the great depression and rapid growth of protectionism. The Bretton Woods systems lead to the creation of two global institutions including the international monetary fund (IMF) and the World Bank. This system was then followed by relative speculations of financial crises (Eckes Jr, 2014). However, the system later was inflexible to handle the increased economic power of the Japan and German. The United States was reluctant to change the domestic economic framework to uphold the pegging of gold.
In 1971, the American president abandoned the linkage with gold while, the fixed exchange mechanism failed. Both the IMF and the World Bank have been able to survive in the current global economy. However, the IMF has been criticized for the restrictions and limitations attached on their loans. On the other hand, the World Bank only focused on funding long-term projects in the developing nations. The meeting proposed for an adjustable foreign exchange rate program. During the region, the currencies compared with gold and only the IMF and the power of control the imbalance of payments. The conference proposed that the currencies should be made easily convertible for promote trade and foreign current account transactions.
Even though gold was the international reserve currency, the U.S dollar was able to gain ground to become an international reserve currency. Being the international reserve currency, the U.S dollar grew to become one of the powerful currencies in the world. All nations’ currencies were linked to the U.S dollar (Eckes Jr, 2014). This helped to prevent financial speculation against the pegging of currencies. Most importantly, the capital flows were restricted. After the linking of the U.S dollar, the global economy experience rapid economic growth. The economic growth surge further improved the value of U.S dollar making it the most powerful currency across the world.

References
Eckes Jr, A. E. (2014). A search for solvency: Bretton Woods and the international monetary system, 1941-1971. University of Texas Press.
United States. Census Bureau (2013). Foreign trade: Top ten countries with which the U.S. has a trade surplus. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/top/dst/current/surplus.html.